prose poem

Reading

Bill Knott reads widely from his work. This reading includes poems from Becos (1983), Outremer (1989), and Poems 1963-1988 (1989), as well as work collected later. 

Reading
Greg Kuzma reads widely from his work.
Reading

David Ignatow reads widely from his work of the 1940s, 1950s, and 1960s; this reading also includes several uncollected poems.

Reading

Kathleen Fraser reads from her collections What I Want (1974) and New Shoes (1978). She also reads an unpublished poem she wrote while staying in the Poet's Cottage.

Reading
Richard Yates reads from his collection Liars in Love, which would go on to be published in 1981.
Reading

Jon Anderson's performance from the Poetry Center's April 1980 tribute to James Wright includes work from three collections by Wright: To a Blossoming Pear Tree, Shall We Gather at the River, and Two Citizens.

Reading

David Ignatow reads widely from his work. This reading includes poems collected in Facing the Tree (1975) and Tread the Dark (1978), as well as uncollected poems and early drafts of poems that would go on to appear in collections such as Whisper to the Earth (1981) and Leaving the Door Open (1984).

Reading

Stephanie Balzer performs prose poems from her chapbooks Revenant and faster, faster. She ends the reading with a discussion about her relationship with prose poem form.

Reading

Demetria Martinez reads work from The Devil's Workshop (2002), Breathing Between the Lines (1997), and Confessions of a Berlitz-Tape Chicana (2005). She also reads a short story from the manuscript of The Block Captain's Daughter, which would go on to be published by University of Oklahoma Press in 2012.

Reading

In his first visit to Tucson, Franz Wright reads prose pieces, most of which were unpublished at the time of his reading, as well as several lineated poems. He comments generously on his writing process and friendships with other poets.

Reading
Chernoff reads widely from Leap Year Day: New and Selected Poems (1990). In addition to poems and prose poems published over several decades, she reads work that would later be published in World: Poems 1991-2001. She closes the reading with a short story from Signs of Devotion and an excerpt from her then-unpublished novel American Heaven.
Reading

In a performance given alongside the Poetry Center's 2011 summer poet in residence, Harmony Holiday, poet Matthew Rotando reads poems from The Comeback's Exoskeleton and newer work.

Reading

C.D. Wright reads the first poem from her collection Tremble (1997) and a selection from String Light (1991), and discusses questions of process and craft.

Reading

Gloria E. Anzaldúa reads widely from her extensive body of work; this reading includes uncollected and unpublished poems.

Reading

Carole Maso reads from a work in progress called The Bay of Angels and shares excerpts from her 2002 prose poem Beauty Is Convulsive: The Passion of Frida Kahlo.

Reading

Luis Alberto Urrea reads from Vatos (2000) and Nobody's Son: Notes from an American Life (2002), along with a poem that would later be collected in The Tijuana Book of the Dead (2015).

Reading

Matthea Harvey reads primarily from Sad Little Breathing Machine (2004). This reading was originally given with Olena Kalytiak Davis and James Thomas Stevens for the Next Word in Poetry Series.

Reading

Italian writer Paolo Valesio reads poems in English translation. He opens the reading with "In Memoriam" from La Rosa Verde (1987) in the original Italian.

Reading

Poet and Poetry Center Interim Director Mark Wunderlich reads a series of poems in response to trauma, loss, and HIV/AIDS. The poems in this reading are from a manuscript-in-progress that at the time was titled The Grooves of This. Most would go on to be collected in Wunderlich's debut, The Anchorage (1999). 

Reading

Srikanth Reddy reads from a manuscript in progress titled "Underworld Lit."

Reading

Mary Ruefle reads poems that would be collected in Dunce (2019) as well as poems from My Private Property (2016) and works that remain uncollected. She also reads poems by W.S. Graham, Antipatros as translated by Kenneth Rexroth, and Annabel Laurance, as well as several humorous found texts, including an inscription from a poetry book found at Goodwill.

Reading

Sawako Nakayasu mixes her poetry and her translations, crafting a reading that she describes as a translation of the innovative form of her book Mouth: Eats Color (2011). She reads her own poems from The Ants (2014) and Some Girls Walk Into the Country They Are From (2020), a manuscript in progress that would be published two years after this reading. She also reads translations of poems by Japanese modernist Chika Sagawa from Mouth: Eats Color and Korean modernist Yi Sang, later published in Yi Sang: Selected Works (2020). 

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