Reading
Jack Gilbert reads widely from poems published in the 37-year period between his first book, Views of Jeopardy, and his fifth book, The Dance Most of All, ultimately published in 2009.
Reading

In this, Louise Glück's first performance at the University of Arizona Poetry Center, she opens with some poems from her third book, The Garden, and then reads from the manuscript of her book Descending Figure, which would be published two years later.

Reading

Thom Gunn reads poems appearing in The Man with Night Sweats (1992) and The Passages of Joy (1982).

Reading

Seamus Heaney reads from Death of a Naturalist (1966), Door into the Dark (1969), Wintering Out (1972), North (1975), Field Work (1979), and Sweeney Astray (1983). The reading also features Heaney's lively banter.

Reading
Kenneth Koch opens this reading with two poems about place: Senegal and Kenya specifically. The rest of the performance is devoted to poems collected in One Thousand Avant-Garde Plays.
Reading

Maxine Kumin reads primarily from House, Bridge, Fountain, Gate (1976), along with selections from her earlier work.

Reading

W.S. Merwin reads from his early collections The Moving Target (1963) and The Lice (1967), as well as from The Carrier of Ladders (1970), which had not yet been completed at the time of this reading. Used with permission of the Wylie Agency LLC.

Reading
W.S. Merwin reads widely from his works. Used with permission of the Wylie Agency LLC.
Reading

Richard Shelton reads from The Tattooed Desert (1970), as well as several poems from Journal of Return (1969) and Of All the Dirty Words (1972).

Reading

Galway Kinnell reads primarily from his 1968 collection of poems Body Rags, which received a special mention from the National Book Award for Poetry in 1969. He begins by discussing and reading poems by Tu Fu, James Wright, Theodore Roethke, Robert Bly, and Walt Whitman.

Reading
John Haines reads from Winter News (1966), The Stone Harp (1971), and Twenty Poems (1971).
Reading

Peter Wild reads poems primarily from Terms & Renewals (1970). He also reads from other recent collections, including The Afternoon in Dismay (1968), Mica Mountain Poems (1968), Love Poems (1969), and Fat Man Poems (1970).

Reading
Mark Doty discusses his experiences in Tucson and reads a poem about the local Tucson attraction The Valley of the Moon. He reads from three books: Atlantis (1995), My Alexandria (1993), and Bethlehem in Broad Daylight (1991).
Reading

Peter Wild reads poems appearing in Getting Ready for a Date(1984), The Peaceable Kingdom(1983), and Barn Fires(1978) as well as uncollected works.

Reading
This reading was given six years before the publication of Jaguar of Sweet Laughter and thirteen years before the publication of I Praise My Destroyer. It also took place during the same year the poet received the Peter I. B. Lavan Award.
Reading

John Williams reads from three novels: Butcher's Crossing (1978), Stoner (1965), and Augustus (1972).

Reading

In this performance, Jimmy Santiago Baca reads from Black Mesa Poems, a collection published the year after this reading took place. He also performs poems from Martín & Meditations on the South Valley, a book that was awarded the Before Columbus American Book Award and earned Jimmy Santiago Baca an NEA grant for the year of this reading.

Reading
W.S. Merwin reads widely from his large body of work. Used with permission of the Wylie Agency LLC.
Reading

Bill Roecker reads poems appearing in Willamette (1970), You Know Me (1972), and Closer to the Country (1976).

Reading

Paul Zimmer reads from The Republic of Many Voices (1969), along with poems that would be published in The Zimmer Poems (1976) or remain uncollected. Making use of persona, narrative, and humor, he addresses topics such as childhood, identity, and mortality.

Reading

Bert Meyers reads from Early Rain and The Dark Birds.

Reading
Although this reading takes place six years before the publication of Except by Nature, most of the poems read come from the working manuscript for the book. This reading was originally given with Pete Fromm.
Reading
Richard Shelton reads widely from his work.
Reading

Here, Hass reads from his collections Field Guide and Praise. He also reads poems that would later be published, under different titles, in his 1989 collection Human Wishes.

Reading
Greg Pape reads from Border Crossings (1978) and Little America (1976).
Reading

Ken Lamberton reads from Wilderness and Razor Wire (2000) and Time of Grace (2007); both collections explore his views of nature from prison.

Reading

Louise Glück reads from her 2001 collection of poems The Seven Ages.

Reading

W.S. Merwin reads from Travels (1993), The Rain in the Trees (1988), and The Shadow of Sirius (2008). Used with permission of the Wylie Agency LLC.

Reading

Ofelia Zepeda reads from Where Clouds Are Formed (2008). This reading was originally given with Christopher Burawa.

Reading

Hayden Carruth reads a generous selection of work written from the 1960s to the early 1990s, from his Collected Shorter Poems, 1946-1991 (1992) published the same year as this reading. Many of the poems embody the people, places, and rural culture of Vermont. By request, he closes his reading with a poem about James Wright.

Reading

Given as part of the Poetry Center's "Oh Earth, Wait for Me: Conversations about Art and Ecology" series, this performance begins with Sandra Alcosser speaking about a variety of writers and artists in the context of The Language of Conservation Project and ends with readings from Except by Nature, A Fish to Feed All Hunger, and several uncollected sonnets.

Reading

Lila Zemborain and Rosa Alcalá present their work as part of the Poetry Center's Fall 2009 sequence of themed readings, "Oh Earth, Wait for Me: Conversations about Art and Ecology." In the first half of the reading, Zemborain reads poems in Spanish and Alcalá reads their translations in English. Next, Alcalá reads her own poems. The performance closes with a poem read simultaneously in English and Spanish.

Reading

Geraldine Connolly reads poems informed by sense of place, particularly Montana, in a performance for the Tucson Festival of Books.

Reading

Pamela Uschuck reads poems from Scattered Risks (2005), Greatest Hits (2009), and Crazy Love (2009).

Reading

In this performance, originally given with Alice Notley at the 2010 Tucson Festival of Books, Mei-Mei Berssenbrugge reads poems that would go on to be collected in Hello, the Roses (2013).

Reading

Mexican poet Tedi López Mills reads from her work in Spanish at the 2010 Tucson Festival of Books, accompanied by her translator, Wendy Burk, who reads the poems in English. The reading includes work from an unpublished bilingual manuscript of López Mills's selected poems.

Reading

Gary Snyder reads poems that will be collected in The Back Country (1968) and talks about his experiences in Japan. He also reads one section of his long work Mountains and Rivers Without End (1996).

Reading

In his first visit to Tucson, Franz Wright reads prose pieces, most of which were unpublished at the time of his reading, as well as several lineated poems. He comments generously on his writing process and friendships with other poets.

Reading

Mexican poet Homero Aridjis reads work reflecting his environmental activism and engagement with Mexican history, drawn from his 2001 bilingual publication Ojos de otro mirar / Eyes to See Otherwise: Selected Poems. The English translations of Aridjis's poems (by Eliot Weinberger, George McWhirter, and Betty Ferber) are read aloud by Alison Hawthorne Deming.

Reading

Ofelia Zepeda reads from her collection Where Clouds Are Formed (2008).

Reading

In his first reading at the Poetry Center since 1969, Gary Snyder reads broadly from his work, including poems from his most recent collection, Danger on Peaks. He ends by reading uncollected newer poems. Snyder also speaks of his time in Japan, his studies of Zen Buddhism, and his friendship with Poetry Center founder Ruth Stephan.

Reading

Sherwin Bitsui reads from his work in English and Navajo as part of a multilingual poetry reading also featuring Alberto Rios (reading in English and Spanish) and Ofelia Zepeda (reading in English and O'odham). The reading includes selections from Water, an artist book created by Karla Elling to commemorate the Poetry Center's 50th anniversary. "Water" features a chainlink of poetry composed and translated by Bitsui, Rios, Zepeda, and Zapotec poet Natalia Toledo.

Reading

Alberto Ríos reads from his work in English and Spanish as part of a multilingual poetry reading also featuring Ofelia Zepeda (reading in English and O'odham) and Sherwin Bitsui (reading in English and Navajo). The reading includes selections from Water, an artist book created by Karla Elling to commemorate the Poetry Center's 50th anniversary. Water features a chainlink of poetry composed and translated by Bitsui, Ríos, Zepeda, and Zapotec poet Natalia Toledo.

Reading

Pat Mora reads from her first two books of poems, Chants (1984) and Borders (1986), as well as poems that would later be published, sometimes in different versions, in Communion (1991) and Agua Santa (1997). Mora, who hails from El Paso, includes several poems about the desert in honor of what she describes as "probably the first time I have done a reading in another desert area."

Reading

Laura Tohe reads from Tséyi': Deep in the Rock; Reflections on Canyon de Chelly (2005), which pairs Tohe's texts with images by photographer Stephen E. Strom. Following Tohe's reading, Strom discusses the images contained in the book.

Reading

Joni Wallace reads primarily from her collection Blinking Ephemeral Valentine and also an unpublished piece accompanied by the guitarist Greg Lewis. This is the first half of a reading which also featured Mary Jo Bang.

Reading

A group reading celebrating the release of Spiral Orb 5, a poetic inventory of saguaro national park.

Reading

John D'Agata reads from his book About a Mountain (2010).

Reading

Peter Wild reads primarily from Chihuahua (1976). He also reads several poems from a variety of other publications.

Reading

Byrd Baylor reads from Yes Is Better than No (1977) and I'm In Charge of Celebrations (1986).

Reading

Ruth Stone reads extensively from In an Iridescent Time (1959) and Topoography and Other Poems (1971); she also reads some unpublished poems.

Reading

In this reading, originally given with Jane Miller, Alison Hawthorne Deming reads primarily from her collection Genius Loci (2005).

Reading

In this reading and presentation, originally given with Charles Alexander, writer and biologist Elizabeth Bernays reads from her large body of literary works and discusses her entomological research.

Reading

In this reading, originally given with Eloise Klein Healy, Peggy Shumaker reads from the collection Toucan Nest: Poems of Costa Rica (2013) and presents photographs from a series of residencies in Costa Rica.

Reading

Linda Hogan reads poems from her collections Calling Myself Home (1978), Seeing through the Sun (1985), Savings (1988), and The Book of Medicines (1993). The reading also includes an essay from Dwellings: A Spiritual History of the Living World (1995).

Reading

Melissa Buckheit reads from Noctilucent (2012), as well as new and uncollected work. This reading was originally given with Karen Rigby and Anne Shaw.

Reading

Tedi López Mills reads poems from While Light Is Built (2004) with translations read by Wendy Burk.

Reading

Aurelie Sheehan reads from Jewelry Box: A Collection of Histories (2013). This reading was originally given with Farid Matuk.

Reading

Linda Gregg reads primarily from Too Bright to See (1981).

Reading
Mary Szybist reads from her National Book Award-winning collection Incarnadine (2013).
Reading
Terry Tempest Williams reads primarily from Desert Quartet: An Erotic Landscape (1995); she opens this reading with a performance of a poem by May Swenson.
Reading

John Ashbery reads poems that would later be collected in Hotel Lautréamont (1992), as well as an excerpt from Flow Chart (1991).

Reading

Australian poets Vincent Buckley, Les Murray, and David Malouf visit Tucson to read their work, also providing background and commentary. Les Murray reads a selection of poems in chronological order, including his oldest poem "The Burning Crook." Vincent Buckley reads from Golden Builders (1976), Late Winter Child (1979), and The Pattern (1979), as well as some unpublished poems. David Malouf reads both poetry and passages from his novel An Imaginary Life (1978).

Reading
Felipe S. Molina speaks about the traditions of the Pascua Yaqui people during Holy Week. The program includes testimonies from Jenny Murrieta, Susana Garcia, and Minnie Valenzuela, discussing their cultural backgrounds, family, and the spiritual time of Cuaresma.
Reading
Robert Bringhurst reads selections from his poetry, providing background and historical context.
Reading

Gretel Ehrlich discusses the process of collaboration on a series of poems composed for a ballet. She reads poems from this series, including "Resolute Passage"; she also reads excerpts from "The Fasting Heart," an essay collected in Islands, The Universe, Home (1991).

Reading
Medbh McGuckian reads poems from throughout her career, not long after the announcement of a historic ceasefire in her native Northern Ireland.
Reading
Longtime University of Arizona faculty member Peter Wild reads poems from throughout his prolific career.
Reading
This celebration of Ruth Wulpi Meenan's life and work includes reflections and excerpts from her biography, poems, and songs, performed by Francesca Jarvis, Edna Church, and David J. Ashcraft. At the end, the audience is invited to contribute memories and reflections, and the event concludes with orchestral/choral performances of "Silent Night," "Joy to the World," and Handel's "Hallelujah Chorus," among others.
Reading

This reading was originally scheduled as a joint appearance by Brazilian poet Adélia Prado and her translator Ellen Doré Watson, but Prado was unable to travel due to health issues. Watson thus reads her translations of Prado's poetry, as collected in The Alphabet in the Park: Selected Poems (1990), and plays recordings of Prado reading some of her poetry in the original Portuguese.

Reading
1995 Summer Resident Kymberly Taylor reads poems including "Where the Wild Things Went" and "Bird by Bird, Into This and This," which incorporates notations of birdsong from the book Born to Sing: An Interpretation and World Survey of Bird Song (1992) by Charles Hartshorne.
Reading

Susan Fromberg Schaeffer reads poems from her collections The Witch and the Weather Report (1972), Granite Lady (1974), The Rhymes and Runes of the Toad (1975), and Alphabet for the Lost Years (1976), many inspired by nature, teaching, and biblical themes.

Reading
James Galvin reads from poems on themes such as the age of exploration and museum art.
Reading
Pattiann Rogers reads poems from her collection Firekeeper: New and Selected Poems (1994).
Reading

John A. Williams reads poems from an early manuscript that would eventually come to form his collection Safari West (1998). He then reads from his novel !Click Song (1982), investigating issues of race, colonialism, and diaspora. Both books are winners of the American Book Award.

Reading

Pulitzer Prize-winning poet and novelist Maxine Kumin reads from her then-recent collection Nurture (1989), together with poems written throughout her career, as well as two poems that would go on to be collected in her next book, Looking for Luck (1992). Many of the poems consider connections between animals and humans. Kumin also reads a series of three elegies to her longtime friend Anne Sexton.

Reading

Luci Tapahonso reads from her collections Seasonal Woman (1982) and A Breeze Swept Through (1987), beginning with a piece that combines spoken poetry with song.

Reading

Ofelia Zepeda reads from her poetry collections When It Rains, Papago and Pima Poetry = Mat hekid o ju, 'O'odham Na-cegitodag (1982), Ocean Power: Poems from the Desert (1995), and Jewed 'I-hoi, Earth Movements (1997). She reads the poems first in O'odham, and then in English.

Reading
Judith Barrington reads from History and Geography (1989), opening the reading with "Countries"; she also reads several poems that would go on to be collected in Horses and the Human Soul (2004). The reading includes additional uncollected poems such as "Word Bank" and "Instructions to the Reader of Poetry."
Reading
Diane Glancy reads a range of works on the theme of story. She also reads from Pushing the Bear: A Novel of the Trail of Tears (1996), which would be published two years after this reading.
Reading

Pulitzer Prize–winning poet Stephen Dunn opens with "Under the Black Oaks," the poem he had most recently written at the time of this reading. Dunn reads poems from throughout his career, often on the theme of family, including a poem about losing his mother, an atheist's parenting dilemmas as his daughter moves toward Christianity, and an ode to the sister he never had.

Reading
Roland Flint, Poet Laureate of Maryland at the time of this reading, opens with early poems from Say It (1979) and Resuming Green (1983). Flint reads from his National Poetry Series volume Stubborn (1990), interspersing work from Stubborn with recently written poems, some of which would go on to be published in Easy (1999). Flint also discusses his work as a translator of Bulgarian and reads several of his translations.
Reading
Richard Jackson reads long poems from his collection Worlds Apart (1987) and others that would be collected in Alive All Day (1992). He begins with a poem by Thomas Hardy, "I Looked Up from My Writing."
Reading

Nanao Sakaki performs poems and songs in the courtyard of the Poetry Center on Cherry Avenue. Asking the audience, "Any questions? I'll answer by my poems," Sakaki addresses themes raised by audience members such as anger, feeling at home, time, walking, and love for the desert and all forms of life.

Reading

Annie Guthrie reads poems from her collection the good dark (2015) and from a manuscript titled let x (be rogue). This reading was originally given with Richard Siken.

Reading

Mark Doty reads from his collection of poetry Deep Lane (2015).

Reading

Brenda Hillman reads from her books Bright Existence (1993), Practical Water (2009), and Seasonal Works With Letters On Fire (2013), along with uncollected and new poems. 

Reading

Essayist and poet Erik Reece reads poems from A Short History of the Present (2009) and essays from An American Gospel: On Family, History, and the Kingdom of God (2009) as well as Utopia Drive: A Road Trip Through America's Most Radical Idea (2016).

Reading

Wendy Burk discusses and reads from her translation of Tedi López Mills' Against the Current (2016) and her own first collection of poems, Tree Talks: Southern Arizona (2016). This reading was originally given with Renee Angle.

Reading

Joy Harjo reads from Conflict Resolution for Holy Beings (2015) and How We Became Human: New and Selected Poems (2002). She also plays flute and soprano saxophone. This reading was given as part of the Climate Change & Poetry Series.

Reading

Alison Hawthorne Deming discusses the Climate Change & Poetry Series. She also reads from Stairway to Heaven (2016) and from uncollected work. This reading was given as part of the Climate Change & Poetry Series.

Reading

Aimee Nezhukumatathil reads poems from At the Drive-In Volcano (2007), Lucky Fish (2011), and her forthcoming collection Oceanic (2018).

Reading

At the 2017 Thinking Its Presence Conference, members of the MT+NYC Collaborative (Ciara Rose Griffin, William F. Hubbard, Kendra Mylnechuk, Aja M. Sherrard, and Brooke Swaney) perform an early draft of The Buffalo Play, a play written by Ciara Rose Griffin and Kendra Mylnechuk. 

Reading

Maurya Simon reads poems from The Wilderness: New & Selected Poems 1980-2016 (2018). This reading was originally given with Peggy Shumaker as the inaugural reading in the Tom Sanders Memorial Reading Series. 

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