Track

Yanyi. Dream of the Divided Field. New York: One World, 2022.

Track

Toledo, Natalia. "Lidxie be'ñe' / Lagartera / Alligator Home." Translated from Spanish to English by Clare Sullivan. The North American Review, vol. 304, no. 4, Fall 2019. Web. Accessed 13 May 2024.

Track

Toledo, Natalia. The Black Flower and Other Zapotec Poems. Translated by Clare Sullivan. Los Angeles: Phoneme Media, 2015.

Reading

Adrienne Rich reads poems appearing in The Will to Change (1971) and Diving into the Wreck (1973), as well as more recent poems that would be collected in Poems: Selected and New, 1950-1974 (1975).

Reading

In this reading, Silko engages in "what I really love to do"--storytelling in the Laguna tradition. Most of the stories and poems told here would be collected in the 1981 volume Storyteller.

Reading

Michael S. Harper reads from across his first four books, all published in the years shortly before this reading: Dear John, Dear Coltrane (1970), History Is Your Own Heartbeat (1971), Song: I Want a Witness (1972), and Debridement (1973). Harper shares poems that delve into the loss of children, racial inequality, and the Vietnam War, mixing them with poems that express his love for his wife and family.

Reading

D.M. Thomas reads from Two Voices (1968) and Logan Stone (1971). This reading was originally given alongside Peter Redgrove and includes two tracks of collaborative reading with Redgrove.

Reading

In her opening lecture for the Poetry Center's "Oh Earth, Wait for Me: Conversations about Art and Ecology" series, Alison Hawthorne Deming draws connections between the folk tale of Baba Yaga and the myth of Demeter in order to explore the intersections of science, myth, and ecology.

Reading

Barbara Cully reads from her collection That Place Where (2011).

Reading

N. Scott Momaday reads from across his body of work, sharing excerpts from his novel The Ancient Child (1989) together with poems from his soon-to-be-published In the Presence of the Sun: Stories and Poems, 1961-1991 (1992). After opening the reading with three humorous epitaphs, Momaday discusses Set-angya, a 19th century Kiowa chief who reappears throughout his work.

Reading

Gloria E. Anzaldúa reads widely from her extensive body of work; this reading includes uncollected and unpublished poems.

Reading

Peter Wild reads uncollected poems on a diverse range of subjects, from famous Western frontiersmen to radio therapy to optometrists. Along the way he shares with the audience experiences and preoccupations that have shaped his work.

Reading

Special guest Logan Phillips performs his poetry for the Southern Arizona Poetry Out Loud Regional Finals Competition.

Reading

Linda Gregg reads primarily from Too Bright to See (1981).

Reading

Richard Siken reads poems from Crush (2005). This reading was originally given with Camille T. Dungy and Heriberto Yépez for the Next Word in Poetry Series.

Reading

Robin Robertson reads poems from his books Sailing the Forest: Selected Poems (2014), A Painted Field (1997), and Hill of Doors (2013).

Reading

In this trilingual event, Zapotec-language poet Natalia Toledo and translator Clare Sullivan read from Toledo's The Black Flower and Other Zapotec Poems (2015) and a forthcoming collection titled Deche bitoope / El dorso del cangrejo / Carapace Dancer. All poems are read in Zapotec (Toledo's originals), Spanish (translated by Toledo) and English (translated from the Spanish by Sullivan). Toledo reads from Mexico City via Zoom.

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