Track

Lee, Li-Young. The City In Which I Love You. Brockport: BOA Editions, 1990.

Reading

In Louise Glück's first performance at the University of Arizona Poetry Center, she opens with some poems from her third book, The Garden, and then reads from the manuscript of her book Descending Figure, which would be published two years later.

Reading

Li-Young Lee reads primarily from his second collection, The City in Which I Love You, which was published the same year as this reading. He also reads one poem from his first collection, Rose (1986).

Reading
Czeslaw Milosz reads widely from his work.
Reading

Poet, playwright, and novelist Owen Dodson reads a range of poems from his distinguished career. As he introduces his poems, Dodson reflects on his consciousness as a writer, from his undergraduate days at Bates College to his engagement with spirituality, Civil Rights, and social justice.

Reading

Paul Zimmer reads from The Republic of Many Voices (1969), along with poems that would be published in The Zimmer Poems (1976) or remain uncollected. Making use of persona, narrative, and humor, he addresses topics such as childhood, identity, and mortality.

Reading

In this performance, Robert Creeley reads from and discusses his chapbook Yesterdays, published shortly before the reading by Chax Press. He also reads poems that would be published in his posthumous collection On Earth. Creeley closes with the poem "Generous Life," from If I Were Writing This.

Reading

In this reading, originally given with Joni Wallace, Mary Jo Bang reads poems that would go on to be collected in The Last Two Seconds (2015) as well as a segment from her translation of "Canto III" of Dante's Inferno (2012).

Reading

Reed Whittemore reads poems that would later appear in his collection Poems: New and Selected (1967), as well as one unpublished poem.

Reading

Jack Gilbert reads primarily from The Great Fires: Poems 1982-1992 (1995) and Refusing Heaven (2005).

Reading
Winners of the Poets & Writers Maureen Egen Writers Exchange Award, Laura Kasischke and David Reynolds read from their winning manuscripts. Kasischke reads poems from Housekeeping in a Dream, and Reynolds reads the chapter "Hush, Noah" from In the Waiting World.
Reading

Richard Marius reads an excerpt from an early draft of his novel After the War (1992).

Reading
This celebration of Ruth Wulpi Meenan's life and work includes reflections and excerpts from her biography, poems, and songs, performed by Francesca Jarvis, Edna Church, and David J. Ashcraft. At the end, the audience is invited to contribute memories and reflections, and the event concludes with orchestral/choral performances of "Silent Night," "Joy to the World," and Handel's "Hallelujah Chorus," among others.
Reading
Marilynne Robinson reads from her novel Housekeeping (1981).
Reading

Marcia Southwick reads poems from the second half of The Night Won't Save Anyone (1980), along with poems that would go on to be collected in Why the River Disappears (1990).

Reading

Lynn Luria-Sukenick reads two works of fiction ("The Man With The Blues Guitar" and "Still Life With Bath"), along with a short performance piece called "Bomb." "Bomb" is a collaboration with poet and musician Rob Brezsny, whose part is performed here by Jonathan Penner.

Reading
1995 Summer Resident Kymberly Taylor reads poems including "Where the Wild Things Went" and "Bird by Bird, Into This and This," which incorporates notations of birdsong from the book Born to Sing: An Interpretation and World Survey of Bird Song (1992) by Charles Hartshorne.
Reading

Pulitzer Prize-winning poet and novelist Maxine Kumin reads from her then-recent collection Nurture (1989), together with poems written throughout her career, as well as two poems that would go on to be collected in her next book, Looking for Luck (1992). Many of the poems consider connections between animals and humans. Kumin also reads a series of three elegies to her longtime friend Anne Sexton.

Reading

Jim Simmerman reads from a manuscript that would become his collection Kingdom Come (1999), a series of persona poems written in the voices of various Biblical characters. Jewell Parker Rhodes reads from her first novel, Voodoo Dreams: A Novel of Marie Laveau (1993), inspired by the life of the famed 19th century Voodoo Queen. She reads two scenes from the novel, the first set just before Marie Laveau's tenth birthday, and the second during the performance of one of Laveau's greatest miracles.

Reading

Pulitzer Prize–winning poet Stephen Dunn opens with "Under the Black Oaks," the poem he had most recently written at the time of this reading. Dunn reads poems from throughout his career, often on the theme of family, including a poem about losing his mother, an atheist's parenting dilemmas as his daughter moves toward Christianity, and an ode to the sister he never had.

Reading

Nanao Sakaki performs poems and songs in the courtyard of the Poetry Center on Cherry Avenue. Asking the audience, "Any questions? I'll answer by my poems," Sakaki addresses themes raised by audience members such as anger, feeling at home, time, walking, and love for the desert and all forms of life.

Reading

Annie Guthrie reads poems from her collection the good dark (2015) and from a manuscript titled let x (be rogue). This reading was originally given with Richard Siken.

Reading

Essayist and poet Erik Reece reads poems from A Short History of the Present (2009) and essays from An American Gospel: On Family, History, and the Kingdom of God (2009) as well as Utopia Drive: A Road Trip Through America's Most Radical Idea (2016).

Reading

Renee Angle reads from her book-length poetry project WoO (2016). This reading was originally given with Wendy Burk.

Reading

Jane Miller reads poems from Who Is Trixie the Trasher? and Other Questions (2018). This reading was originally given with Farid Matuk.

Reading

Li-Young Lee reads new and uncollected work as well as two poems from his collection The Undressing (2018). This reading was given as part of the Tom Sanders Memorial Reading Series. 

Poetry Center

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